World Championship finalist Khamica Bingham to race at AC Indoor Open

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athletics canada

February 18, 2014 (ISN) – Athletics Canada is happy to announce today that Khamica Bingham of Caledon, Ont., will race in the women’s invitational 60-metres at the AC Indoor Open in Montreal, March 14-16.

Khamica holds the Canadian youth record in the 100-metres and is one of Canada’s young and upcoming sprint talents. She finished just .01 seconds out of a medal position at the 2012 IAAF World Junior Championships. Last summer at the 2013 World Championships, Khamica ran the anchor leg on the 4×100-metres relay team that broke the Canadian record and placed sixth overall.

AC: We’re almost six months removed from the Moscow World Championships. What memory or thought sticks with you most about your first senior Worlds?

KB: The greatest memory that still sticks with me most is anchoring the 4×100-metres relay heats where we broke the Canadian record. I remember that the exchange with Shai wasn’t the greatest; I had to slow down to make sure we made the exchange in the zone. We still made the exchange successfully, then I ran as hard as I could, dipped at the line and looked up to see 42.99 (seconds) pop up on the screen. At first we were all excited because we ran a huge personal best from our previous 43.46. We stood and waited for the last heat of the relays to see if we would qualify for the final. As it turned out the third place finisher in the last heat was slower than our time and the Bahamas team who won our heat got disqualified, we made the finals as an automatic qualifier. Just knowing that we were sixth in the world after only putting a relay team together four months before the Championships was incredible to me.

AC: At just 19 years of age you’re already part of the Canadian women’s record team and were just .01 away from a medal at World Juniors. What do you attribute your success to?

KB: There are a few but really important are the people who contributed to my success in 2012 at the World Juniors and in 2013 at the World Championships. I have to give a lot of credit to my first club coach Frank Bucca, who helped me develop from a mediocre athlete to top ranked in the world for my age in one year. His amazing coaching abilities are the main reason I was ranked number one in Canada for the 100-metres in both youth and junior seasons. Also, of course, I always have a competitive drive to do well, so my hard work along with the support from my parents and friends were all essential to my success. However, right before World Juniors, I was suffering from tendonitis in my lower hamstring and running at World Juniors was questionable. Thankfully, Jane, the team therapist and George Kerr, the sprints coach for the team, adjusted my training program and treated my leg, making me healthy enough to run in all three rounds of the 100-metres at World Juniors finishing fourth with a personal best of 11.46.

Now 2013 that was a really good and different season because it was the first time the women had a relay team since 2001. I have to thank my current coaches Desai Williams and Anthony McCleary for believing in me and making me a part of the women’s relay program. Although in 2013 I wasn’t training with Anthony or Desai, Desai, the coach for the women’s team, made me feel otherwise. He always motivated us and taught me everything I need to know about relays. His coaching knowledge and drive for success really helped our team be sixth in the world. Also I have to give credit to Anthony McCleary for working with me on my running form (lifting knees, relaxing the shoulders) to run faster with only weeks leading up to the World Championships. Because of Desai and Anthony, I felt mentally and physically prepared to run at the World Championships with my 4×100-metres relay team.

AC: Are you currently at York University? Take us through what a typical day of class and practice is like for you.

KB: Yes, I recently transferred to York University in January this year looking to major in Communications. A typical day for me starts with practice at 11:00 a.m. During practice we’ll warm up for an hour, complete the workout, which at the moment is a speed workout. Afterwards we’ll do drills, core and weights to finish practice. Normally practice ends around 4:30 p.m. For recovery, I’ll either get treatment or hop in the ice bath and prepare for practice the next day. At the moment to relieve stress from long days at the track, I’m taking multiple online courses. So once I get home from practice, I log in to my online courses, take notes, study and write quizzes all in the comfort of my bedroom.

AC: What have you been working on in training and/or racing to continue getting faster?

KB: In practice my main focus for improving my times is my start. I have spent a significant amount of time doing video analysis, medicine ball exercises and speed work to quicken my first few steps out of the blocks into the acceleration phase. Also, I have been continuing to work on my running form, which is lifting my knees while relaxing the shoulders when I sprint.

AC: After last year’s successful season, what goals are you focused on for this year?

KB: Since I am competing in CIS for the York Lions this year, I would have to say that for the indoor season CIS is a focus. However, I recently ran a personal best in the 60-metres of 7.28, so my coaches and I are hoping that if I can lower my time to the IAAF World Indoor standard (7.22), then World Indoors would definitely be a goal of mine to attend. For the outdoor season, I would have to say that the Commonwealth Games in Scotland are a major focus for me at the moment.

AC: What advice do you have for other young athletes that are trying to race against more experienced competitors?

KB: Being one of the youngest athletes in my training group, I have learned that in any race you have to go into that race mentality strong believing that you can and will win. You train everyday just like the others, so believe in what you train for. As hard as it is, try not to put older or more experienced athletes on a pedestal because you mentally already accept defeat. Anything can happen, someone can have a bad day or you could just have a really good day. Therefore, give it all you have; they’re the ones who should be nervous because they have all the expectations to win. So run, jump or throw to the best of your abilities because at the end of the day you have nothing to lose, they do. Use that as motivation. If it doesn’t happen as soon as you would like, then be patient. You’re time will come.

AC: What are you most looking forward to on your trip to Montreal for the AC Indoor Open?

KB: I look forward to a great competition with many experienced athletes. Since I am the only female in my training group competing in CIS this year, I don’t really get the chance to run against my teammates or other experienced runners outside of CIS athletes. It’s the last meet for indoors and a chance to run a fast time, spend time with my teammates and enjoy the beauty of Montreal after the meet is finished.

The 2014 AC Indoor Open will take place in Montreal, Que., March 14 – 16 at the newly renovated Centre Claude-Robillard. The event serves as a Canadian Championship for youth and junior athletes and will feature a number of Olympians and World Championship national team members in invitational events. For more information and to register for the inaugural AC Indoor Open visit www.indoors.athletics.ca.

2013 World Championship

Athletics Canada is happy to announce today that

Khamica Bingham of Caledon, Ont.,

will race in the women’s invitational 60-metres at the AC Indoor Open in Montreal, March 14-16.

 

Khamica holds the Canadian youth record in the 100-metres and is one of Canada’s young and upcoming sprint talents. She finished just .01 seconds out of a medal position at the 2012 IAAF World Junior Championships. Last summer at the 2013 World Championships, Khamica ran the anchor leg on the 4×100-metres relay team that broke the Canadian record and placed sixth overall.

 

AC: We’re almost six months removed from the Moscow World Championships. What memory or thought sticks with you most about your first senior Worlds?

 

KB: The greatest memory that still sticks with me most is anchoring the 4×100-metres relay heats where we broke the Canadian record. I remember that the exchange with Shai wasn’t the greatest; I had to slow down to make sure we made the exchange in the zone. We still made the exchange successfully, then I ran as hard as I could, dipped at the line and looked up to see 42.99 (seconds) pop up on the screen. At first we were all excited because we ran a huge personal best from our previous 43.46. We stood and waited for the last heat of the relays to see if we would qualify for the final. As it turned out the third place finisher in the last heat was slower than our time and the Bahamas team who won our heat got disqualified, we made the finals as an automatic qualifier. Just knowing that we were sixth in the world after only putting a relay team together four months before the Championships was incredible to me.   

 

AC: At just 19 years of age you’re already part of the Canadian women’s record team and were just .01 away from a medal at World Juniors. What do you attribute your success to?

 

KB: There are a few but really important are the people who contributed to my success in 2012 at the World Juniors and in 2013 at the World Championships. I have to give a lot of credit to my first club coach Frank Bucca, who helped me develop from a mediocre athlete to top ranked in the world for my age in one year. His amazing coaching abilities are the main reason I was ranked number one in Canada for the 100-metres in both youth and junior seasons. Also, of course, I always have a competitive drive to do well, so my hard work along with the support from my parents and friends were all essential to my success. However, right before World Juniors, I was suffering from tendonitis in my lower hamstring and running at World Juniors was questionable. Thankfully, Jane, the team therapist and George Kerr, the sprints coach for the team, adjusted my training program and treated my leg, making me healthy enough to run in all three rounds of the 100-metres at World Juniors finishing fourth with a personal best of 11.46.

 

Now 2013 that was a really good and different season because it was the first time the women had a relay team since 2001. I have to thank my current coaches Desai Williams and Anthony McCleary for believing in me and making me a part of the women’s relay program. Although in 2013 I wasn’t training with Anthony or Desai, Desai, the coach for the women’s team, made me feel otherwise. He always motivated us and taught me everything I need to know about relays. His coaching knowledge and drive for success really helped our team be sixth in the world. Also I have to give credit to Anthony McCleary for working with me on my running form (lifting knees, relaxing the shoulders) to run faster with only weeks leading up to the World Championships. Because of Desai and Anthony, I felt mentally and physically prepared to run at the World Championships with my 4×100-metres relay team. 

 

AC: Are you currently at York University? Take us through what a typical day of class and practice is like for you.

 

KB: Yes, I recently transferred to York University in January this year looking to major in Communications. A typical day for me starts with practice at 11:00 a.m. During practice we’ll warm up for an hour, complete the workout, which at the moment is a speed workout. Afterwards we’ll do drills, core and weights to finish practice. Normally practice ends around 4:30 p.m. For recovery, I’ll either get treatment or hop in the ice bath and prepare for practice the next day. At the moment to relieve stress from long days at the track, I’m taking multiple online courses. So once I get home from practice, I log in to my online courses, take notes, study and write quizzes all in the comfort of my bedroom.

 

AC: What have you been working on in training and/or racing to continue getting faster?

 

KB: In practice my main focus for improving my times is my start. I have spent a significant amount of time doing video analysis, medicine ball exercises and speed work to quicken my first few steps out of the blocks into the acceleration phase. Also, I have been continuing to work on my running form, which is lifting my knees while relaxing the shoulders when I sprint.

 

AC: After last year’s successful season, what goals are you focused on for this year?

 

KB: Since I am competing in CIS for the York Lions this year, I would have to say that for the indoor season CIS is a focus. However, I recently ran a personal best in the 60-metres of 7.28, so my coaches and I are hoping that if I can lower my time to the IAAF World Indoor standard (7.22), then World Indoors would definitely be a goal of mine to attend. For the outdoor season, I would have to say that the Commonwealth Games in Scotland are a major focus for me at the moment. 

 

AC: What advice do you have for other young athletes that are trying to race against more experienced competitors?

 

KB: Being one of the youngest athletes in my training group, I have learned that in any race you have to go into that race mentality strong believing that you can and will win. You train everyday just like the others, so believe in what you train for. As hard as it is, try not to put older or more experienced athletes on a pedestal because you mentally already accept defeat. Anything can happen, someone can have a bad day or you could just have a really good day. Therefore, give it all you have; they’re the ones who should be nervous because they have all the expectations to win. So run, jump or throw to the best of your abilities because at the end of the day you have nothing to lose, they do. Use that as motivation. If it doesn’t happen as soon as you would like, then be patient. You’re time will come. 

 

AC: What are you most looking forward to on your trip to Montreal for the AC Indoor Open?

 

KB: I look forward to a great competition with many experienced athletes. Since I am the only female in my training group competing in CIS this year, I don’t really get the chance to run against my teammates or other experienced runners outside of CIS athletes. It’s the last meet for indoors and a chance to run a fast time, spend time with my teammates and enjoy the beauty of Montreal after the meet is finished. 

 

 

The 2014 AC Indoor Open will take place in Montreal, Que., March 14 – 16 at the newly renovated Centre Claude-Robillard. The event serves as a Canadian Championship for youth and junior athletes and will feature a number of Olympians and World Championship national team members in invitational events. For more information and to register for the inaugural AC Indoor Open visit www.indoors.athletics.ca.

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