Climber Will Gadd Ascends Frozen Niagara Falls

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Climber Will Gadd Ascends Frozen Niagara Falls Photographer Credit Christian Pondella/Red Bull Content Pool

 

Professional climber Will Gadd took ice climbing to new heights by being the first person ever to ascend the frozen sections of the world’s largest flowing waterfall, Niagara Falls.

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Climber Will Gadd Ascends Frozen Niagara Falls Photographer Credit Christian Pondella/Red Bull Content Pool

 

(ISN) – NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK (USA) – Gadd scaled the northern most part of the famous Horseshoe Falls starting from the frozen river base of Niagara River and climbing to Terrapin Point on Goat Island, the block of land that separates the Horseshoe Falls and American Falls. The climb distance is 140 feet and the route ran almost exactly along the United States and Canadian border, a fitting route for Gadd as a dual citizen of the two countries – born in Colorado and now a long time resident of Alberta, Canada.

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Climber Will Gadd Ascends Frozen Niagara Falls Photographer Credit Christian Pondella/Red Bull Content Pool

 

“I’ve traveled the world in search of the most challenging climbs, but Niagara Falls, one of my home country’s most iconic landmarks, has been a lifelong mission that I previously never thought possible,” said Gadd. “It was very real on that wall. There’s a lot going on. The ice thickness varies from one inch to 10 feet, so every swing and grab is different. There’s a lot to account for, all this with the world’s most powerful waterfall flowing over my shoulder.”

The recently released footage shows Gadd navigating through ice shelves, spray ice blocks, and treacherous rock walls to accomplish this first-ever feat. With 150,000 tons of water flowing over the crest every minute at speeds of nearly 70 MPH, the generated impact is equivalent to roughly 4,000 eighteen-wheel trucks hitting the ground at the same time.

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Climber Will Gadd Ascends Frozen Niagara Falls Photographer Credit Christian Pondella/Red Bull Content Pool

 

“The massive water flow constantly shakes the ground and makes the ice shelves and walls around you unsteady and unpredictable. It’s a harsh environment and an intense challenge to stay attached to the wall let alone climb it,” remarked Gadd.

With this historic climb, he adds to a list of impressive achievements over the past year. He’s been nominated as one of National Geographic’s Adventurers of the Year, has climbed the rapidly melting ice glaciers of Kilimanjaro and won the prestigious Ouray Ice Festival competition.

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