What is the future state of the Olympic Games?

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What is the future state of the Olympic Games?

The Olympic Games are changing. A slew of recent developments indicate the Games will vigorously adapt to confront unique challenges.

Remember that old Olympic poster hanging in your gym teacher’s office? Like these ones. Imagine storied Olympic champions, heaving the discus and running marathons through the warm winds of Olympia.


But…

How about sinewy big wave surfers, world-famous cricketers or explosive ballet dancers? What activity would ignite your enthusiasm if thrown into the Olympic spotlight?

India's MS Dhoni, left, watches as Australia's Shane Watson, right, hits four runs during their One Day International cricket match in Melbourne, Sunday, Jan. 18, 2015. (AP Photo/Andy Brownbill)

India’s MS Dhoni, left, watches as Australia’s Shane Watson, right, hits four runs during their One Day International cricket match in Melbourne, Sunday, Jan. 18, 2015. (AP Photo/Andy Brownbill)

What if you had the chance to not just update the Games, but re-imagine them?

The Olympics are very large and extremely valuable. The idea of Olympism is respected, but the question of what the Games will mean to the future world is a relevant one. 

Over the next few weeks Olympic.ca will examine the future state of the Olympic Games.

And it isn’t entirely hocus pocus. At last December’s IOC Session in Monaco, 40 recommendations were adopted including one which allows an Olympic organizer (such as Tokyo 2020) to add sports or events they can make a case for. The IOC Session decides on the Olympic inclusion of any sports not already on the programme.

Beijing 2008 was the last time baseball and softball were included in the Olympic Games. South Korea beat Cuba 3-2 for the baseball gold medal.

Beijing 2008 was the last time baseball and softball were included in the Olympic Games. South Korea beat Cuba 3-2 for the baseball gold medal.

For example: Baseball/softball and squash lost out to wrestling in 2013. Wrestling had formerly been on the Olympic program (starting in 1908) and won back its spot during an IOC Session vote. Karate and wushu have also shown interest in joining the Olympic programme.

You know karate, but this is wushu:

Realistically, none of the writers at Olympic.ca are the president of the IOC, and it’s extremely likely none of us ever will be. But that won’t stop us from saying what we’d do if we were Thomas Bach. What do you think would be a good addition to the Olympic Games (summer or winter)? Let us know on Twitter or Facebook.

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